Category Archives: Christianity

As it says, reflecting my faith

When the road is rough and steep, fix your eyes upon Jesus

When the road is rough and steep, fix your eyes upon Jesus

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The final climb on Ingleborough

So ran a chorus we often sang at a youth group many decades ago and it seems very apt when climbing a mountain. At times climbing a mountain is a sweat when the path is particularly steep and unrelenting. This month I went up Skiddaw and the first part was simply straight up and steep!

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There are many parallels between climbing a mountain and following Jesus. Five hours is a short day! Often it can be seven or eight hours and ten is a bit on the long side!! However, it is more the vertical height gained than the actual horizontal distance and once I did nine miles in eight hours going up Triglav in Slovenia. But that did include well over 6000ft of vertical climbing – often over a great drop!

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That was a day and a half but ascending over 3000ft in a day is common as I did on Skiddaw.

Apart from everything else, from proper equipment to preparing the route, a key aspect is to stop every hour for five minutes, to look at the view, drink, a nibble – and allowing muscles to recover. All mountain advice holds this and for enjoyment I follow it. The results are surprising. After your rest you set off of with a new spring in your step, and you find you are no longer flagging. The longer the day the more important it is. In fact, it is totally irresponsible and dangerous not to stop for regular rests. Not stopping for rests puts you and all your party at risk. On mountains that can mean death, or, at best, an unenjoyable experience.

So back to chorus, what is the parallel with our daily life as Christians. Yes, we can flog our guts out and find the whole Christian way is tedious and tiring. That is wrong as we need to rest – and pray.

Stopping for private prayer and worship is not a luxury, or something we do when we feel like it, but something we should be doing all the time. That includes Sunday worship and private prayer. (I can hear someone saying, “you don’t need to go to church to be a Christian.” True, but you don’t have to eat, drink or sleep to be alive, but if you neglect those you’ll soon be dead.)

Time spent in worship and prayer is like a mountaineer stopping for a rest. It may seem to be of little use as you could do other things in that time. BUT, you are renewed and then can carry on further without conking out. It should be obvious that someone who doesn’t worship or pray will find their faith slowly but surely fades away.

You don’t really NEED to stop every hour on a mountain but you are liable to get knackered and have to turn back if you don’t. You will soon give up mountain-climbing.

You don’t NEED to pray to be a Christian!

But if you want fix your eyes on Jesus when the road is rough and steep, you will be as rigorous about prayer and worship as a hardened mountaineer is about taking rests on the mountain.

Michael Roberts

 

Churchwardens.

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It is interesting to contemplate a tangled bank

It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank;

So Charles Darwin begins the last paragraph of The Origin of Species. Now entangled banks are very common in Britain especially at the side of roads and country lanes. As a youngster Darwin must have ridden or walked past many near his home in Shrewsbury, including those on the way to Woodhouse when he went to see his first girl-friend, Fanny Mostyn Owen.

To me our entangled banks are a joy throughout the year and are very good for the succession of wild flowers, which cannot be reached by those despoiler of nature with their mowing machines.

Here are some taken in May 2018. The first five were taken on the lane by Millbeck just below Skiddaw which I climbed today. The last two are near Goosenargh by Preston. Here one can only see spring flowers and related plants, with no visible fauna. Also invisible are the microbial and fungal life which are very much present and essential to thriving life. To few are aware of them.

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I could have identified every flower and fern, but have left that to one side. To me there are two routes to the appreciation of nature/creation. One is identifying every creature, whether plant, animal or fungus and the other is more emotive and reflective and that is, to use a contemporary term, to “bathe in it”. In other words we simply enjoy what we see and experience and to be filled with awe and wonder.

I have long felt that Darwin went down the second route as he wrote the final paragraph of The Origin. It wasn’t entirely his own as it has echoes in an earlier piece by Sir David Brewster.

It is interesting to contemplate a tangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent upon each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the conditions of life and from use and disuse: a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.

Yet he seems to follow the two routes flitting like an insect or wren between the two. Perhaps we ought to flit like that as well and move easily from aesthetic awe to a scientific understanding and not see them in conflict. He starts like a nature mystic, worthy of any tree hugger and then flits to science as “all been produced by laws acting around us.” And then after more sciency stuff, like our wren he flits back; “There is grandeur in this view of life.”

When we read the sixth edition, we find “the Creator ” is mentioned but in 1859 he wrote “having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that,” without mentioning God, leaving the source of the breathing as unspecified. However, whether we prefer the First or the Sixth edition, it is clear that Darwin did not see the natural world as a machine which simply needed disecting to be explained, but that the sum total of living things (biosphere!) fill us with wonder and awe and this is prior to scientific explanation.

 

We could write and argue for hours on whether or not Darwin believed in God as Creator, but he had the sense of awe, which any theist should have. Though I must add I have known too many Christians who don’t give a damn about nature or creation.

So years after Darwin a Jesuit priest took up poetry and many of his poems are nature/creation inspired. His poem on the kestrel The Windhover renamed the raptor to be more acceptable to Victorian sensibilities! Undoubtedly his finest poem on creation is God’s Grandeur;

The world is charged with the grandeur of God.
It will flame out, like shining from shook foil;
It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil
Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod?
Generations have trod, have trod, have trod;
And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil;
And wears man’s smudge |&| shares man’s smell: the soil
Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.

Hopkins starts with an awareness of natural beauty which he saw daily in the Vale of Clwyd. He moves to damaged creation, which I reckon are the mines at Halkyn mountain to the east. They are still devoid of beauty

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Not a pretty site!!

And for all this, nature is never spent;
There lives the dearest freshness deep down things;
And though the last lights off the black West went
Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs —
Because the Holy Ghost over the bent
World broods with warm breast |&| with ah! bright wings.

Yet Hopkins has hope in the renewal of creation and, unusually, theologically looks to the Holy Spirit

 

There is so much here and I explored it in another blog; https://michaelroberts4004.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/gods-grandeur-gerard-manley-hopkins/  . In this sonnet written five years before Darwin died he evokes the grandeur of God in creation, the frequent pollution by humans, ending with the optimism of the earth’s renewal. Perhaps all doomster environmentalists should ponder the last four  lines and look with hope to a restored creation.

It is no surprise that so many Christian look to God’s Grandeur today.

And so to the Bible on Creation. Apart from Genesis there is so much on creation in the Bible, especially in the Wisdom Books and the Prophets. Some of the finest writing on creation is the end of Job. Many of the psalms are nature psalms and one of the finest and briefest is Psalm 8

 O LORD, our Lord, how majestic is thy name in all the earth! Thou whose glory above the heavens is chanted 2 by the mouth of babes and infants, thou hast founded a bulwark because of thy foes, to still the enemy and the avenger. 3 When I look at thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars which thou hast established; 4 what is man that thou art mindful of him, and the son of man that thou dost care for him? 5 Yet thou hast made him little less than God, and dost crown him with glory and honor. 6 Thou hast given him dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet, 7 all sheep and oxen, and also the beasts of the field, 8 the birds of the air, and the fish of the sea, whatever passes along the paths of the sea. 9 O LORD, our Lord, how majestic is thy name in all the earth!

The main theme is wonder at creation, and the psalmist almost sees creation as a reflection of the Glory of God (God’s Grandeur). The reference to babes and infants shows it is no erudite worship but available to all. It poses the question what humanity is,and then echoes Genesis with humans being given dominion over creation. That is often contentious as so often that dominion has been bully-boy tactics rather than loving nuture.

These three writings from such different writings and settings all speak of the glory and wonder of the natural world. Darwin in the sixth edition is the weakest theist, but brings out so much of the wonder by focussing simply on an entangled bank. Hopkins and the Psalmist go further and thus I conclude with the Psalmist

O LORD, our Lord, how majestic is thy name in all the earth!

 

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I was stoned, wrote the Apostle St Paul

I WAS STONED, wrote Paul.

Yes that is what he wrote in 2 Corinthians 11 vs 25 – or a literal translation is “Once I was stoned”!!! In the greek it is ἅπαξ ἐλιθάσθην,

This was used in the New International Version of the Bible in 1984 and created some amusement. The NRSV has “Once I received a stoning”, which is a convoluted translation. Most versions have “once I was stoned”, but;

God’s Word translation has “Once people tried to stone me to death”

The Message bible; “pummeled with rocks once.”

New International Reader’s Version; “Once they tried to kill me by throwing stones at me.”

 

Thus it was revised in the NIV as the New Testament scholar Douglas Moo pointed out;

“In the 1984 NIV when Paul says (in 2 Corinthians 11:25) ‘I was stoned,’ we changed it to ‘pelted with stones’ to avoid the laughter in the junior high row of the church.”

Well, “I was stoned” is a succinct literal translation and correct on all grounds bar one, and that is the contemporary understanding of the expression “I was stoned”

It highlights a problem of all translations. There are other instances where the original meaning can be lost in translation e.g. If your son asks for some fish , will you give him a snake?” In some countries a snake is more of a delicacy .

It reminds of two devout Christians in a university Christian Union in the 60s. They took Paul’s injunction “make love your aim” to heart and jumped into bed……………

Of course it is worse if we read the King James Version which was archaic posh English of 1611 and so much of English has changed. No wonder fundermentalists who only use the KJV get so many things wrong!!

As for myself I have only be stoned once, like Paul – by pygmies from the Congo 😁

Not kidding either.

Intelligent Design is neither design nor up to scratch

This paper is nearly 20 years old and compares the views on Design by William Buckland in 1832 and Michael Behe in 1996. It is still topical as neither buckland nor Behe have changed their views since I wrote the paper 🙂

Since then Intelligent Design proponents have preached to an ever-shrinking choir.

Even so too many conservative Christians still think their arguments are valid.

Design Up to Scratch? A Comparison of Design in Buckland (1832) and Behe

 

Michael B. Roberts

From: Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith 51.4 (December 1999): 244-252. Response: Mills

 

Intelligent Design has attracted both its supporters and denigrators. Behe’s Darwin’s Black Box has been a secular best seller. This paper1compares Intelligent Design with nineteenth century Paleyan design, by comparing the philosophy and methods of Bucklandís lecture on “Megatherium” in 1832 with Beheís philosophy in Darwinís Black Box. Buckland regarded every detail as showing design and practiced reverse engineering, but Behe regards only the unexplained to show design. To put it pithily; Buckland saw the demonstration of design in explaining. Behe sees the demonstration of design in not explaining.

 

“The result of these cumulative efforts to investigate the cell is a loud piercing cry of design” So wrote Michael Behe in Darwin’s Black Box and continued by saying: “But no bottles have been uncorked, no hands slapped.”2

This best-selling volume is the most well-known work on Intelligent Design and the ripples from it have reached my side of the pond. Many pagesóon and off the web, both critical and censoringóare devoted to it. As there are hundreds of web pages, this contribution may be superfluous. Darwinís Black Box has gained attention from the National Center for Science Education and Dr. Eugenie Scott has called exponents of Intelligent Design, the Neo-Creationists.3

Among all the controversy Behe and other Intelligent Designers have raised, it is assumed that they have relaunched the Argument from Design. This paper considers whether or not Intelligent Design is a revival of the design argument of William Paley and his successors. Ideally one needs to trace out the history of the design argument and deal at length with Paley and Hume, the Bridgewater Treatises, and other early nineteenth-century design arguments. Then one should deal with the challenge raised by Darwin and the response of thinkers such as Asa Gray, T. R. Birks, and Julia Wedgwood (Snow), whose precise relationship to Darwin would, according to Jim Moore, make an interesting paper in itself. Each of these arguments is worthy of a critical, yet sympathetic re-appraisal without stooping to a pejorative approach such as used by Altholz, when he patronizingly dismisses Paley by saying: “The smoothness and clseness of Paley’s arguments had a certain fatuous charm.”4

One may question how far those who criticize Paley have actually read his works. It is certainly fatuous to criticize him and his successors without a careful consideration of the design argument in a historical context. Rather than present a long, historical exposition and comparison, I shall focus very narrowly and compare Beheís Darwinís Black Box with William Bucklandís expositions of the design of Megatherium, an enormous extinct relative of the sloth.

Unlike Paley who was a competent theologian, Buckland was a first-rate, nineteenth century scientist and one of the strongest proponents of design. He was a leading geologist and was Reader of Geology and Mineralogy at Oxford University from 1818 to 1845, when he was also Canon of Christ Church. From 1845 he was Dean of Westminster where his interests turned toward sewage and the need for sanitation in the cholera-racked capital. Sadly his latter years were marred by mental illness. He died in 1857.

Buckland is easily dismissed for his early interest in the Deluge as a key geological mechanism, but both Davis Young and Stephen Gould have stressed his superb geological competence.5 He was the first to discover Mesozoic mammals in the Stonesfield slates near Oxford, and the one who introduced concepts of an Ice Age to Britain after a field trip to Switzerland with Agassiz in the fall of 1838.6 (Ironically Darwin recorded evidence of glaciers in Shrews- bury in July 1838, but never published his findings.7) Theologically he was on the edge of evangelicalism, as may be evidenced by the support he received from Anglican evangelicals, such as J. B. Sumner (Archbishop of Canterbury 1848ñ1862) and G. S. Faber. W. F. Cannon overstates the case by claiming Buckland was a Broad Churchman,8 but this is probably due to the problem that many have believing an evangelical can have good scientific credentials. After all, no scientist could possibly be an evangelical!

Stories abound about Buckland, from eating his way through the animal kingdom to making earrings for lady-friends out of coprolite! Darwin described him as “a vulgar and a most coarse man. He was incited more by a craving for notoriety, which sometimes made him act like a buffoon.”9 His friends were more appreciative. Thomas Sopwith, who traveled with him to North Wales in October 1841, wrote in his diary: “with Dr. Buckland for a companion, fatigue was impossible” even when traveling through North Wales in torrential rain.

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Buckland dressed for the Welsh glaciers

Of all Paleyís contemporaries, Buckland was his most loyal disciple and the strongest scientific exponent of design, even while friends and colleagues such as Whewell and Sedgwick were moving away from Paley.10 No one was better qualified to write a Bridgewater Treatise than Buckland for both scientific and theological reasons. His volume entitled Geology and Mineralogy Considered with Reference to Natural Theology11 was the best seller of the eight and found its way into many Mechanics Libraries and George Eliotís Mill on the Floss. (The Bridgewater Treatises were commissioned because the Earl of Bridgewater, an eccentric Anglican clergyman, who had a parish in Shropshire, left £ 8,000 in his will when he died in 1829 for the publication of works to demonstrate “the power, Wisdom and Goodness of God as manifested in the Creation.”) As well as being a compendium of geology, Bucklandís volumes were full of design in the geological world.

Buckland on Megatherium

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To Buckland Megatherium was an excellent creature to demonstrate the design of God for reasons which shall become apparent. Some years earlier, an almost complete skeleton of the extinct Megatherium had been brought back from the Pampas in South America. Its very grossness and bizarre structure made it remarkable. It was a good twelve feet in length, stood eight feet high, and had enormous feet a yard long. Being covered in bony armor with an unusual snout and interlocking teeth, it could not fail to attract attention. The Megatherium also gave a considerable challenge to any who wished to demonstrate design from its odd anatomy. That was a challenge Buckland could not resist.

Buckland’s first demonstration of the design of Megatherium took place at the second annual meeting of the British Association held in Bucklandís home city of Oxford in 1832. On the night of June 23, he lectured until midnight to the edification and entertainment of all present at the Holywell music room. The lecture was never published but is still extant in the form of seventy-two pages of beautiful copperplate handwriting. Whether this represents the text of the lecture Buckland prepared or a transcript, one cannot know. It is probably a full transcript by someone else as the writing is very legible in contrast to Bucklandís scrawl, which his wife described as “shapeless characters in lieu of legitimate letters.”12.Most likely Mary Buckland, a competent naturalist herself, transcribed the lecture. The transcript also contains many obviously unscripted asides and a few illegible insertions of Buckland scrawl. Later the substance of the lecture was published in a more restrained form in the Transactions of the Linnaean Society and in his Bridgewater Treatise. The latter contains all the scientific substance of the 1832 lecture, but none of the humor.13

At times Bucklandís lecture is long-winded, but it is always larded with wit. He introduced his audience to this creature, “the most monstrous of the monstrous kind” (p. 2). Buckland pointed out that Megatherium was related to the sloths and then stressed that the sloths were “a family whose structure is very anomalous, and has been misunderstood by almost every naturalist including Buffon, even the immortal Cuvier himself” (p. 8). (Cuvier had recently died of cholera and his death was deemed a great loss to science.) Cuvier and Buffon had been arguing that sloths are a very bad design and, if we speak anthropmorphically, are examples where Godís designing abilities are simply not up to scratch, or, in todayís terms, reflect unintelligent rather than intelligent design. Buffon, after describing the clumsy nature of sloths in his Natural History, wrote: “All these circumstances announce the misery of the sloths, and recall to our minds those defective monsters, those imperfect sketches of Nature Ö” And he later wrote: “To regard those bungled sketches as beings equally perfect with others 14

Buckland was determined to show that sloths and their big brother, Old Scratch, were carefully designed creatures rather than bungled attempts at creation.

Having taken on Buffon and Cuvier, Buckland apparently had talked himself into a corner and then had to talk himself out of it by demonstrating the wonderful design of Megatherium. It is impossible to read the lecture without feeling what marvelous theater Bucklandís lectures were. Buckland showed that he had the confidence and skill to talk himself out of a corner because of both his scientific skill and of his faith in the Creator: “from first to last, the same hand that has framed, and the same Almighty mind that has designed the smallest and most complicated of existing creatures” (p. 10). (Do we detect echoes of Blake’s Tyger here?)

Finally after a mere twenty pages of introduction, he began to discuss Megatherium, saying: “We will begin at the beginning with the nose the most important feature in all animals” (p. 20) though I smell the aroma of burlesque at this point! From there he expounded a detailed anatomy of the big beastie. Behind the humor and buffoonery is a deadly serious purpose as he sought reasons for Design in every aspect of Megatheriumís anatomy, commenting: “I before observed nature is prodigal of contrivance where contrivance is necessary and most rigidly economical when it is unnecessary” (p. 22).

From the nose, Buckland worked through the teeth, on to the fore legs, and finally to the rear legs and the armor. On each he gave both ribald humor and detail, pointing out that “we have here marks of intention and design” (p. 36). He likened the interlocking teeth in the jaw with iron teeth in a rat- or man-trap, commonly known as a gin- trap. The purpose of the alternating “angular projections of iron” was to lay “hold of a Boys or a rats leg” (p. 32). Then he indicated that the jaw was “not a rat trap but a potatoe (sic the spelling makes one Quayle!) trap as I will show you presently” (p. 32).

Next Buckland moved to the front legs, which are massive and designed for the support of an enormous weight rather than for locomotion. He called attention to the unusual shoulder blade that gave “him a free, playful, roundabout motion with his fore leg” (p. 34) and to the fore leg that is larger than its hind leg. He then observed that Old Scratch’s equivalent of a funny bone was huge, for the purpose of attaching an enormous muscle necessary to support the massive digits on its front feet. With typical Bucklandian buffoonery and almost sexist humor, he observed that if a lady pianist had a proportionally large funny bone “that with her hand she could cover the whole length of a piano” (p. 37)! On the meter-long feet, he could not resist humor in describing the size of the heel bone which was more than a foot in diameter: “The bone on which rests the animal is as big as the head of Professor Babbage” (p. 38). One may imagine the ribald laughter at this point, but fortunately the serious, young Darwin was at the antipodes as, like the future queen, he would not have been amused. Buckland continued to expound the structure of the rear limbs, tail, and armor and to emphasize and argue that Megatherium was very well designed for its station in life.

Finished with the anatomical description, he next explained the function of Megatherium. His buffoonery, so hated by the prim and proper Darwin, came to the fore. It “has been suggested by Professor Sedgwick who thinks we have found old Scratch himself Ö That he could scratch and did scratch is quite evident and that without scratching he would have died is a fact I will endeavour to show you. If he did scratch, then arises the question, what did he scratch?” (pp. 40ñ1). And so over the next pages, Buckland gave a lively interpretation of reverse engineering applied to Old Scratch. His reverse engineering or artifact hermeneutics was also painstaking and rigorous, and is as fine an example as anything Dennett may give us.15

Buckland concluded with a flourish:

Gentlemen his teeth indicated a peculiarity of structure; they were not calculated to eat leaves or grass; they were not calculated to eat flesh; he was an eater of vegetables. What then remained for him but roots? He has a spade, and he has a hoe and a shovel in those three claws in his right hand  He is the Prince of Sappers and miners I speak in the presence of Mr. Brunel the Prince of Diggers (p. 50).

Old Scratch was designed to gather potatoes and other roots at a depth of eighteen inches and relied on armor to repel predators. Buckland could have argued that the armor was compensation for the large cumbersome feet that inhibited its movement. As neither fight nor flight was an option for Old Scratch, he had to envelop himself in armor to keep predators at bay. In contrast to Buffonís miserable sloths, Buckland presented a creature ideally suited to its lot, and since it was designed to scratch, it was happy to scratch. Finally after midnight, Buckland concluded: “Gentlemen, as time is advancing, I must put an end to the present discussion, and I hope you will accept any apology for having detained you so long” (p. 70).


 

 

Design for Paley and Buckland
was the design of
all aspects of a living creature.

 


Thus Buckland had chosen an animal which leading anatomists like Buffon and the immortal Cuvier regarded as having a poor and bungled design to show, by the careful and rigorous anatomical description and then the application of reverse engineering, to be perfectly designed or adapted for its environment. It is almost as if Buckland used his faith in God as a Designer to provide the starting-point for his search for design. One may see this as a particular expression of a theistic outlook, where one expected to find design in creation. Here, for Buckland, design was not so much a scientific theory, but rather a metaphysical or theological outlook, which gave confidence or grounds for applying reverse engineering procedures. In his Bridgewater Treatise, Buckland applied similar techniques for other extinct creatures, but design for inanimate geology was more problematical.

 a progressive creationist, Buckland considered all living creatures to be directly created by God and thus all were designed by the Almighty. Therefore he did not raise issues due to descent and whether the detailed lifestyle of a creature may be due to adaptation rather than design. That is another issue and does not concern us here. The key issue here is that design for Paley and Buckland was the design of all aspects of a living creature.

Darwin’s Black Box

We now move forward 164 years to the publication of Darwin’s Black Box in 1996, which is probably the most discussed work on Intelligent Design and attracts almost equal measure of acclamation and denigration in vast quantities. As a biochemist, Behe spends the major part of the book describing and explaining biochemical processes. He stresses that some, e.g., cilia and blood clotting, have proved very resistant to “Darwinian” explanation and like his irreducible mousetrap represent an irreducible biochemical design. Since my biochemistry is of a rudimentary nature, Behe’s biochemistry will be taken as read. My purpose is to consider the wider implications of his argument for the nature of the creation and his concept of design. I am aware that some question his biochemistry, but that does not effect his basic argument.

Behe’s biochemical exposition leads up to the crux of his argument found in his key chapter on “Intelligent Design” (chapter 11) correctly pointing out: “The impotence of Darwinian theory in accounting for the molecular basis of life” (p. 187). I say correctly, as there is so much on the origin of life and biochemical systems that is unknown. From there he leads into his understanding of design and defines design as “simply the purposeful arrangement of parts” (p. 193). Next he asks: “The scientific problem then becomes, how do we confidently detect design?” He answers in part: “For discrete physical systemsóif there is not a gradual route to their production /design is evident when a number of separate, interacting components are ordered in such a way as to accomplish a function beyond the individual components” (p. 194). And then he says, for design “there must be an identifiable function of the system” (p. 196).


 

 

In discussing the laws of nature, Behe states:
“If a biological structure can be explained in terms of those natural laws,
then we cannot conclude that it was designed” (p. 203).

 


After discussing how biochemists “design” new chemicals by using mutation and selection, Behe moves to a natural/created world that is part designed and part not. In discussing the laws of nature, Behe states: “If a biological structure can be explained in terms of those natural laws, then we cannot conclude that it was designed” (p. 203). Thus if a biochemical system can be explained by mutations or by any other mechanism, then it was not designed. But if it cannot be explained, then it was designed. Therefore, for Behe, cell membranes and hemoglobin are not designed, but cilia and the mechanism of blood clotting are designed.

Behe argues that some other biochemical mechanisms are designed and discusses these at length in chapter 3 to chapter 6. As well as the blood-clotting system mentioned above, he brought forward the function of the cilium as a motorized paddle and as the intracellular transport system. His conclusion at the end of this long section of several chapters was to go “into a lot of detail to show why they could not be formed in a gradualistic manner” (p. 160). He claims that these “are a problem for Darwinism.” They both are and are not. In a relatively young science like biochemistry, much is still unexplained. However, a comparison of biochemistry in the 1930s, when my father isolated lysosyme and a colleague estimated its molecular weight as about 18,000, and today does support Darwinians (whoever they are!) in their optimism of future breakthroughs.16 In the words of Sir Peter Medawar, no scientist can go beyond “the Art of the Soluble.” What is insoluble today is often soluble tomorrow.

Now let us consider the non-designed structures. Every form of life depends on the cell and thus membranes to contain cells. Behe points out that the membranes are formed in a manner akin to the way detergent molecules associate to form bubbles. “Because these molecules form bubbles on their own (my italics) Ö it is difficult to infer intelligent design from cell membranes” (p. 206). There is an illogic here. No one would challenge that there is “an identifiable function of the system” (p. 196) in that the cell membranes have a clear function. As the function is apparent (in containing the cell material) this surely shows “a function beyond the individual components” (p. 194). As there is “an identifiable function of the system,” then the cell membrane reflects design according to Beheís previous argument. Yet he claims cell membranes do not show design because their origin can be explained.

Behe gives a similar argument for hemoglobin and holds that “the case for design (of hemoglobin) is weak” (p. 207) because the starting point, myoglobin, already can bind oxygen. So he concludes: “I would say that hemoglobin shows the same evidence for design as does the man in the moon: intriguing, but far from convincing.” In contrast, Behe argues that the blood-clotting system is designed as “fibrinogen, plasminogen, thrombin, protein C, Christmas factor, and the other components of the pathway together do something that none of the components can do alone” (p. 204). His argument here seems to be that as biochemists have intelligently designed alterations to the blood-clotting system to prevent unwanted blood clots, i.e. thromboses, blood clotting must have been intelligently designed in the first place. It is odd, to say the least, that the transport of oxygen in our bodies by hemoglobin is not designed, yet, when we cut ourselves, the clotting of blood in the wound is design. One may ask, “Is only the clotting of blood fearfully and wonderfully made, but not hemoglobin itself?”

While on holiday in the Alps, I meditated on the implications of Bucklandís and Beheís concepts of design as I was walking at about 10,000 ft. That is the height at which I begin to feel the effects of altitude and have to slow down. One morning I ascended a pass, the Col du Lame at 3,040 meters, which is overshadowed by le Petit Combin with its glaciers. Despite the length and steepness of ascent up some immense lateral moraines, I kept up a good pace exhilarated by feeling fit. I thought about Behe’s argument that hemoglobin is not designed. As I scrambled up the last few hundred feet of steep and very unstable scree, I kept saying to myself, “Hemoglobin is not designed, thus my good aerobic condition is not God-given.” Then I realized that if I slipped off the loose rock onto the glacier headwall below, I would be shredded on the rapid descent. And as I lay bleeding at the foot of the slope, design would come into action as my bleeding wounds began to clot. Fortunately, I did not slip. At the summit of the col, I continued to think of design as I contemplated the panoramic view with Mont Blanc to the west and the Great St. Bernard Pass below me. The beauty was breathtaking. I asked myself, “Is all this designed? Are glaciers designed?”

120

A 21st century glacier on Mt St Helens 2009

The last few hundred feet of my climb had been over steep scree with irregular, easily dislodged boulders lying at about the angle of rest, which was simply dumped by the retreating glacier in the last fifty years. It would be hard to suggest that moraines are designed as they contain all the subtleties of a fleet of dumper trucks unloading. That is not to say that a competent glacialogist cannot explain their origin and the physical laws which were called into play. It would be interesting to consider how Buckland would have considered the design of glaciers, as it was he who brought glacial theory to Britain in 1838. In fact, none of his writings on glaciation, published or unpublished, make any mention of design. Glaciers seem to lie outside Buckland’s concept of design. I consider glaciers to be some of the most wonderful parts of creation, but I cannot see how design comes into it.

Though one might argue that we should restrict design to life structures, most advocates of design past and present do argue that the planet, for example, is designed for life to exist. Undoubtedly glaciers are an extreme case, but the question of design must be considered. The example of hemoglobin, however, as undesigned and blood clotting as intelligently designed does pose a problem and I hope I have focused the issue in a personal and not too rarefied way. Behe’s proposed solution concludes that explainable biochemical processes are not designed and unexplainable ones are designed. That belief is contrary to a biblical doctrine of creation in which everything is created, as we say in the Nicene Creed: “I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, and of all things, visible and invisible.” If not actually contrary to the doctrine of creation, Behe’s explanation does create a serious theological problem, as some of creation is designedly created whereas the rest is undesignedly created. We, therefore, end up with a two-tier creation where some life systems, which are due to the process of natural laws, are not designed and where others, which are not due to the process of natural laws, are supernaturally designed.


 

 

Beheís proposed solution concludes that
explainable biochemical processes are
not designed and unexplainable ones are designed.

 


This is in total contrast and contradiction to the design theory of Buckland. As we saw in his Mega- therium lecture, he challenged the “unintelligent design” theories of Buffon and Cuvier, and insisted that if God created, he must have designed. And if God had designed, he designed well. Buckland sought to explain every last detail of Old Scratch and how he was designed. There was no two-tier creation for Buckland; God had created (and thus designed) “all things, visible and invisible.” To Buckland the work of a scientist was to work out how God had designed whatever creature one was studying.

Behe has totally misunderstood the classic design arguments of William Paley (pp. 210ñ19). Beheís refutation relies on ridicule rather than engagement. Paley and his successors are worthy of far more respect, especially when considered in their historical context. Though Paley was no practicing scientist and made no claims to be one, the “mixed bag” dismissed by Behe reflects a wide understanding of contemporary anatomy. Behe mocks Paley’s use of compensation to explain certain aspects of anatomy, but, in fact, his (or, rather, everyone else’s!) principle of Compensation resurfaces in Cuvierís Recherches sur les ossements fossiles de quadrupedes and in Bucklandís lecture on Megatherium and his Bridgewater Treatise as discussed above.17

Beheís lack of biological understanding lets him down badly here, both in consideration of historical and contemporary issues. Further, Paley and Buckland were convinced that God had designed everything down to the last detail, which is a reasonable inference from their particular creationist belief. Paley wrote as an informed theologian, but Buckland was a geologist of the first rank. One may say that Paley and Buckland followed a total design theory. They simply practiced reverse engineering or artifact hermeneuticsóso well described in Dennettís Darwinís Dangerous Ideaóand looked for the function of biological features. The more skeptical of Paleyan design such as Sedgwick and Whewell went for a partial design theory. Darwin had questioned design from 1838 when he dismissed Maccullochís book on design with comments such as “What Bosch!!”18


 

 

Buckland saw the demonstration of design in explaining.
Behe sees the demonstration of design in not explaining.

 


It is essential to see what Behe and other exponents of Intelligent Design are actually saying. They adopt reverse engineering and where this explains a feature, then that feature is not designed. Design is reserved only for those features that cannot be explained. By this they think they ensure a place for the creative activity of the Intelligent Designer/God. Our two advocates of reverse engineering, Buckland and Dennett, would concur, though for very different reasons, that ultimately a reason for any structure will be found. Dennett always pushes for a Darwinian or rather a naturalistic origin, while Buckland usually stops at explaining the design without considering the origin. Behe at times considers both the design and the origin as in hemoglobin, but if the origin can be explained, that means it had a naturalistic rather than a designed origin.

If Behe’s Intelligent Design argument is followed consistently, the result is to have two aspects of creation or nature: (1) those aspects whose origins can be explained by gradual steps, which are thus due to natural laws but are not designed; and (2) those aspects which cannot, and will not, be explained by natural laws, and these have been designed.

To put matters as baldly as possible: Buckland saw the demonstration of design in explaining. Behe sees the demonstration of design in not explaining. So much for Beheís claim that “the result of these cumulative efforts to investigate the cell is a loud piercing cry of design” Thus it is quite fitting that “no bottles have been uncorked, no hands slapped.”19

Intelligent Design in Behe’s hands is a far cry from the design arguments of previous centuries and compare unfavorably with them, because much of creation is removed from the domain of the Intelligent Designer.

Rhetoric and Restatement in Design and Evolution

In their recent Gifford Lectures, John Brooke and Geoffrey Cantor discuss Natural Theology as Rhetoric and expound several examples from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries including Buckland on Megatherium. They point out: “It is important to re-emphasize that natural theologians did not deploy such evidence (from Design) to prove (in the strong deductive sense) the existence and attributes of God.” The design argument was an inductive argument and its conclusion was deemed a “moral” truth. They cite Campbell, a contemporary writer: “In moral reasoning we ascend from possibility  to probability to the summit of moral certainty.” With shades of Phillip Johnson they suggest that “the persuasiveness of arguments suggest a close similarity between natural theology and the proceedings of the courtroom Ö Persuasion becomes the name of the game.”20

Considered in this light, the design argument as employed by Buckland and Behe becomes a rhetorical argument with shades of a persuasive advocate and lawyer. The rhetoric gives design both its strength and its fatal flaw. This highly charged courtroom atmosphere was present in the music room at Holywell when Buckland gave his tour de force on Megatherium. Buckland gave a superb scientific account of its peculiar anatomy which would have impressed the lately departed “immortal Cuvier,” but throughout the lecture was the implicit message: “the adaptation of Old Scratch is so wonderful and demonstrates the skill of the Designer, who is none but the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.” Buckland began with the possibility that sloths were not as poor a design as Buffon and Cuvier insisted. As he described Old Scratch so favorably, he moved to probability and then to the moral certainty of his theistic conclusion. This worked well as Buckland was able to give an explanation of every part of its anatomy, but he could not have done so if he had chosen or found vestigial organs.

In The Origin of Species, Darwin picked up this flaw and showed how this was swept under the carpet by appeals to the Divine Plan. He wrote: “In works on natural history rudimentary organs are generally said to have been created for the sake of symmetry, or in order to complete the scheme of nature but this seems to me no explanation, merely a restatement of fact.” The fact is that God is the Creator.

Behe also makes great use of rhetoric above and beyond his biochemistry, but his rhetoric is of a different nature. Having led the reader through many explainable and unexplainable biochemical functions and the rhetorical appeal of his mousetrap, he uses an inductive rhetorical argument and argues that the absence of an explanation, as in the case of blood clotting, indicates the direct activity of a Designer. He rapidly moves from possibility to probability to moral certainty, but that certainty is only certain until an explanation is found. What Behe has done is to base a rhetorical argument on his mousetrap and thus his conclusion of a Designer is only a “restatement of fact” based on his original argument.

At the end of The Origin of Species, Darwin wrote: “It is so easy to hide our ignorance under such expressions as the plan of creation, unity of design etc., and to think that we give an explanation when we only restate a fact.” To argue rhetorically, surely Intelligent Design is a restatement of fact?

We may also see argument by rhetoric in the work of Richard Dawkins, most notably with his computer-simulated, evolving biomorphs in The Blind Watchmaker. Here the rhetoric is based on contemporary faith in computer simulation rather than God, but is ultimately no proof of evolution and likewise is “a restatement of fact.” This time the fact is the fact of evolution. Proof would require an actual sequence of evolving plants or animals.

Conclusion

On an initial consideration, it does appear that Behe and other Intelligent Design theorists are reviving the Argument from Design, which has been largely in eclipse since 1859. My purpose has been to compare two competent scientific examples, one from today and one from the heyday of design.

Buckland was, perhaps, the strongest scientific disciple of Paley and his lecture on Megatherium demonstrates a relentless searching for design in the most unpromising of animals. Buckland made a convincing case for demonstrating the function and thus the design of the anatomy of Megatherium. However, a consideration of his approach shows that he was arguing from God to design, in that his belief in a Creator, who was a Designer, gave him the confidence to look for design.

Behe takes a very different approach. When a biochemical process can be explained and its path of origin delineated, then he argues against design. Design is restricted to those processes which defy naturalistic explanation. In contrast to Buckland, Behe argues from design to God and argues from a position of ignorance. His demonstration for design depends on ignorance, and thus it is impossible to consider Beheís understanding other than a God-of- the-Gaps wrapped in designer clothing, or, more flippantly, wrapped up in amino acids.21


 

 

Buckland was arguing
from God to design Ö
Behe argues
from design to God
.

 


Both Buckland and Behe have adopted vulnerable positions. Buckland, as a pre-Darwinian crea- tionist, believed animals were created instantaneously rather than after a period of evolution. Thus from an evolutionary perspective, his design should be seen as adaptation, but like an evolutionist he adopted reverse engineering. Asa Gray and his successors, the theistic evolutionists, would not see this as a major problem. However many whether theist, atheist, or agnostic have seen this as a serious problem.

Behe’s principle of Intelligent Design is vulnerable in several places. First, he assumes too readily that biochemistry has reached such a position of maturity that further advances will not explain what is inexplicable today, hence my charge of God- of-the-gaps. If cilia or blood clotting are explained in a few years, where does that leave his Intelligent Designer? Dawkins and Provine will be most interested! Theologically, the greatest deficiency is his two-tier view of creation, part designed and part naturalistic. This can hardly be considered the biblical or traditional view of creation, which considers God to be the Creator of all creation.

Behe says of evolution: “I find the idea of common descent fairly convincing” but his suggestion of the discrete creation of certain biochemical processes due to Intelligent Design creates a serious problem. This belief undermines his evolutionary perspective as it implicitly adopts a semi-deism, in which God intervened at intervals to introduce another process, e.g. blood clotting, deemed to be due to Intelligent Design. The rest of the time creation, e.g. hemoglobin, was allowed to get on with its evolving in an undesigned fashion.

Finally, one should ask whether design is a biblical idea. I think not and also consider that a strong notion of design, whether of the Paley School or Intelligent Design pushes the concept beyond breaking point. The emphasis should be on God the Creator, not God the Designer. If we follow the former and emphasize the Creator, we can say with Gerard Manley Hopkins:

The World is charged with the grandeur of God.

It will flame out, like shining from shook foil;

It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil

Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod?

However, if we follow Intelligent Design, to represent Behe’s dual world of designed and undesigned, we must parody Hopkin’s poem:

The clotting of blood is charged with the grandeur of God

It will ooze out, like shining from shook foil.

But hemoglobin is not charged with the grandeur of God.

We know not when to reck his rod.

Acknowledgments

The author especially thanks Mrs. D. K. Harman, a descendent of William Buckland, for permission to quote from Buckland’s lecture and for sending me a photocopy. Also to the organizers of the ASA/ CiS conference in August 1998 for giving me the opportunity of presenting this paper. Grants from the Isla Johnston Trust, administered by the Church in Wales, facilitated this research.

Notes

1This paper was prepared for the joint ASA and Christians in Science conference at Churchill College, Cambridge in August 1998.

2Michael J. Behe, Darwinís Black Box (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996), 232ñ3.

3Eugenie C. Scott, “Creationists and the Popeís Statement,” The Quarterly Review of Biology 72 (1997): 403.

4. J. L. Altholz, “The Warfare of Conscience with Theology” in J. L. Altholz, ed., The Mind and Art of Victorian England (Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 1976).

5S. J. Gould, Timeís Arrow, Timeís Cycle (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1988). Passim.

6N. A. Rupke, The Great Chain of Being (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983). This is the most useful recent treatment of Buckland, but is not a biography.

7M. B. Roberts, “Buckland, Darwin and the discovery of Glaciation in Wales and the Marches,” forthcoming.

8W. F. Cannon, “Scientists and Broad Churchmen,” Journal of British Studies 4 (1964): 65ñ88.

9C. R. Darwin and T. H. Huxley, Autobiographies (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983), 60.

10J. Wyatt, Wordsworth and the Geologists (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), 108.

11W. Buckland, Geology and Mineralogy Considered with Reference to Natural Theology, 2 vols. (London: 1836).

12Mary Buckland to Whewell, 12 May 1833″ in Gentlemen of Science: Early Correspondence (London: 1984), 169.

13Those wishing to follow up Bucklandís argument will find his treatment in the Bridgewater Treatise more than adequateóbut not so enjoyable, see ref. 11, 139ñ64.

14Count de Buffon, Natural History: General and Particular, vol. IX, ed. W. Wood (London: 1812), 7, 

15D. C. Dennett, Darwinís Dangerous Idea (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1995), 212ñ3 passim.

16M. B. Roberts, “Correspondence; Darwinís Black Box Reconsidered,” Science and Christian Belief 10 (1998): 189ñ95.

17G. Cuvier, Recherches sur les ossements fossiles de quadrupedes, Discours preliminaire (Paris: Flammarion, 1992), 81ff.

18Barrett, Gautrey, Herbert, Kohn & Smith, Charles Darwinís Notebooks, 1836ñ1844 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987), 634.

19Behe, Darwinís Black Box, 232ñ3

20This is based very closely on J. Brooke, & G. Cantor, Reconstructing Nature (Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1998), 181ñ2.

21H. Van Till, “Special Creationism in Designer Clothing: A Response to The Creation Hypothesis,” Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith 47 (June 1995): 123ñ31; and M. B. Roberts, “Review of Behe, Darwinís Black Box,” Science and Christian Belief 9 (1987): 192.

 


 

My reasons for supporting fracking as the best but not perfect energy source

I wrote this for the newsletter for retired Anglican Clergy as I was requested to do so. It was written two years ago. I attempted to be conciliatory but the next newsletter had a rant of a response from some retired canon, who decided that I was a climate change denier and generally not concerned by the environment. He was clearly blessed with great pastoral gifts – NOT! A nice chappie!

It is two years out of date but the arguments are the same!!

To Frack or not to Frack; that is the question.

On April Fool’s Day 2011 I sent off proofs for a chapter on Evangelicals and Climate Change, where I was critical of American Climate Change deniers. I never noticed the earthquake caused by fracking at Preese Hall ten miles away. After that I began to hear about fracking and was negative initially, but did nothing until a party political leaflet came through the door (not UKIP!). I liked what I read;-improved cycling facilities, recycling, environmental improvements, etc, but the last paragraph made me stamp my feet causing a Magnitude 0.75 quake! The Preese Hall quake was big and dangerous! As a geologist I knew a Mag 2.3 was trivial. When I worked in a Ugandan Copper mine, quakes 1000 times more powerful were common. The most memorable was at an Ascension Day service causing the organist to miss a note! This election leaflet goaded me into action, or rather delayed action as I had limited time until I retired in 2013. And so I began to investigate.
The usual arguments cited are;
• flaming taps due to methane in water,
• toxic chemicals in fracking fluid
• quakes, i.e. minor seismicity.
• poor geology,
• aquifer and water pollution,
• rampant capitalism
• industrialisation of the countryside

and

  • damaging to climate change . (This is used to trump all and to ignore any other challenges on the above points!!

Cuadrilla

The horrors of fracking in Lancashire from Talkfracking
The University of Google directed me to anti-fracking sites, but I wanted something more reliable. As a geologist, I started with the British Geological Survey, and then the United States Geological Survey. Fracking cropped up on the Affiliation of Christian Geologists and so I contacted friends there, along with more friends in the USGS. It soon became apparent that the earthquake concern was very rare, and low risk, and where larger quakes occurred (Mag3 – 5), these were not due to fracking but wastewater injection. These had occurred since the early 80s, i.e. two decades before (the present style of) fracking started and mainly involved waste water from traditional oil production. That is still the case today. (One friend, who in 1991 wrote the earliest papers on these, took me up a couple of 14,000ft mountains in Colorado and I took him up Ingleborough!) Fairly soon, I realised that problems were caused by bad practice rather than the fracking process itself.
After that I left my geological comfort zone and looked at the other issues. I had a choice of three major sources;
• The plethora of publications by anti-frackers, and ‘eco’ organisations.
• technical material from bodies like the BGS, EA, PHE, HSE, scientific bodies and independent academics
• publications from gas operators.
I focussed on the second group. It took time to grasp the technicalities of fracking. I quickly realised that there was little scientific credibility to the antifrack publications. I used the antifrack material to guide what I should look for and ignored material from firms like Cuadrilla. Delving into all this was frustrating and annoying as I became more and more appalled at the inaccuracies of those opposing fracking, including those in the churches.
The straw which broke the camel’s back was my attending a meeting of Frack Off near Garstang in August 2013. I realised then that this meeting promoted ideologically motivated duplicity and scaremongering. More of that later.
I found dealing with anti-fracking rather like dealing with Creationism, which I have dealt with since 1971 after a visit to Schaeffer’s L’Abri in Switzerland – when I thought I was about to join Servetus in Geneva. At the risk of offending Creationists, their arguments are always fallacious, if not dishonest. Creationist claims on the inaccuracy of radiometric age-dating and other scientific questions were poor science. After many years of checking them out, I have never found any which are valid. It is the same with arguments against fracking, which either universalise from examples of bad practice as with pollution of water supplies in Wyoming, exaggerate, or misquote the evidence..
As a result I was forced to re-assess my long-held views on the environment, not that for a moment I even considered rejecting Care of Creation or environmentalism. For 50 years this has itself in appreciation of the natural world, wildlife gardening, economy of energy use and insulation etc. Not to mention my bike as my preferred means of transport, or driving economically. (I try to get 50mpg out of a Corolla which should only do 44!) I had convinced myself of the Peak Oil argument in 1971, not knowing King Hubbert presented it two decades earlier. Peak Oil came to the fore after 2000 when it seemed that fossil fuels would soon run out. I presumed society would be forced to adopt renewables. Shale gas and oil has changed that and almost certainly fossil fuels will NOT run out before 2100. Rather than adjusting to an imposed fossil-free world in a few decades, the limitless (almost) supply forces choices in relation to the environment. Not being a Global Warming Denier, that means a wise use of fossil fuels. Here for many reasons, gas (increasingly fracked) along with every other source of energy except coal is the best option for both the planet and people and here I concur with the IPCC and what actually came out of Paris in 2015!
I began my journey in 2011 rather sceptical of fracking. It was a steep learning curve forcing me to think more about energy and the environment. I came to the conclusion that fracking was the best, or least bad, option and very necessary for Britain. That put me in agreement with the “best environment minister ever” John Gummer aka Lord Deben, but meant that I went against most green Christians. As I considered the whole fracking debate issue to be important, I began to put my head above the parapet. That was impossible to avoid after Cuadrilla applied for two exploration wells 10 miles from my home in February 2014. Now that changed everything. For two years it has dominated many aspects of life in Lancashire.
In February 2014 I went to Cuadrilla’s open meeting at Elswick and was greeted by anti-frackers at the door. Many had arrived in gas-guzzlers! Inside were various stands and many staff from Cuadrilla and Arup. I did not say I had been an exploration geologist but simply asked questions. They gave very reasonable answers and did not try to blind me with science. I went away confident that they were careful operators. A few weeks later I went to a meeting at Inskip of RAFF (Residents against Fracking Fylde). It was very different as the speakers simply peddled the anti-fracking line. During question time I raised questions about a speaker’s geological understanding pointing out it was contrary to BGS reports. I was surprised that she was supported by a Friends of the Earth worker, as I had always had a high regard for FoE. I became aware of hostility to those who did not support the anti-fracking line. About that time lots of anti-fracking signs appeared in the various villages.
dscf6025

One of many signs near the Preston New road site near Blackpool

 

 

this is fracking

The nightmare opponents of fracking have, but forget that this is not fracking with long laterals but close vertical drills.

 

DSCF2898
Welcome toRoseacre! After this appeared houses were difficult to sell
I took copies of the RAFF leaflet Shale Gas; the Facts, which I found to be grossly inaccurate. I was put in touch with Ken, who shortly had complained to the Advertising Standards Agency (ASA) about a leaflet distributed by Frack Free Somerset. Before the ASA made a judgment FFS withdrew the leaflet! Ken and I put in a complaint to the ASA against RAFF https://michaelroberts4004.wordpress.com/2014/08/19/complaint-to-asa-against-raff-residents-action-on-fracking-fylde-for-gross-errors/ . RAFF tried to answer our complaints but shortly before a judgment was due they withdrew the leaflet. We did the same for Frack Free Ryedale who in Feb 2016 withdrew their leaflet. We await the result over a complaint about Friends of the Earth’s leaflet appealing for donations to fund their work in Lancashire. Some may have seen some of the press coverage of FoE in February stemming from Cuadrilla’s complaints to the Charity Commission https://michaelroberts4004.wordpress.com/2016/01/29/how-fiendish-is-friends-of-the-earth/ . At present I am trying to work out what FoE have done in Lancs over the last few years in preparation for a paper to be given at a geological conference. It is clear they worked on local villages and fuelled the local opposition. They also provided training in public speaking in preparation for the June hearings. However those speaking simply repeated the pseudoscientific party line of the antis. My own involvement convinced me that much of the opposition in Lancashire had been fired up by groups like FoE and Greenpeace.

 

foe-leaflet-cover

The substance of the Friends of the Earth leaflet
I also became concerned at the violence, intimidation, and law-breaking from some anti-frack supporters, some of which I observed.
Last autumn, we went on holiday to the USA and as we went to Philadelphia we spent a day going around a fracking area. We were put in touch with the CEO of a local company, who took us on a tour of various wells in hilly woodland. It was more attractive than most forestry commission areas. From the valley the only visual impact was a gas pipeline.

022

 

Trout Run, nr Williamsport, PA. gas pad at top of hill. Forest cleared for gasline

057

 

The “flat hill” is a gaspad with 6 wells. Houseowner happy to have it there

033

Well being drilled 2 mls from previous photo
We were sent on a tour on empty roads. I visited one pad and spoke to a couple whose house was only yards from another pad, and they were quite happy with it all.

I spoke to people in the motel, restaurant and shops. One or two had some reservations but most valued the fracking. This was in Bradford county a supposedly grim area for fracking.
My intention from the beginning was to consider “all sides”, and that meant talking to green groups, industry and “official” bodies and academic institutions. One major problem was that many green groups, whether in the flesh, or online, simply wanted no questioning or dealings with anyone who questioned them. I was more fortunate with the other two categories. Academics in the UK and USA sent me technical papers on request, which were often behind a pay-wall. I have had personal dealings with several and have been on geological fieldtrips with others, as I know the Forest of Bowland well. (some of my blogs on the geology of the Bowland Shales have been used by university geologists!) I have got to know staff from Cuadrilla, and they have also allowed me on-site. I have made useful contacts with many connected with the shale gas industry

003

Three Oxford geology profs and D. Phil student looking at Bowland Shales
As can be seen, fracking is both a technical and a social issue and the two are often inter-twined. Often polarisation gets deep and fractious.

So far the CoE has made no official statement on fracking, but many individuals have. Nearly all follow the anti-fracking line and their ‘science’ is poorly evidenced and argued. Most appear to have no technical or scientific knowledge. Doctorates in literature do not qualify one to speak on drilling wells or geology!
This Church Times article https://www.churchtimes.co.uk/articles/2013/6-september/comment/opinion/wanted-a-green-theology-that-probes-fracking is simply emotional, and this discussion paper from the Blackburn Diocese is very inaccurate and biased. The Url http://www.ctlancashire.org.uk/issues/ (go to fracking) gives the paper and my response.

rape
Cartoon to go with Church Times article. Since removed.
My conclusions of my study are;
• Fracking is as safe as any other industry. The regulations are robust. There is environmental risk (as there is with farming!), but has been greatly exaggerated. There may be accidents and minor environmental spills etc, but the key pollution pathways responsible for many of the US problems have been examined by the Royal Academy of Engineering. This has lead to a raft of regulations.
• Local gas will be better for meeting Climate Change targets, provided there is a concerted effort on renewables, energy efficiency, etc etc. The key climate issue is to eliminate of coal, which may kill 1600 people a year in the UK. LNG imports are worse for the climate than locally fracked gas.
• So often environmentalists polemically present the option of fracking OR renewables rather than both.
• If fracking takes off it benefit employment, especially in Lancs and Yorks.
• It will improve energy security and help the UK’s balance of payments, as North Sea oil did for decades.
However fracking alone is insufficient. Other aspects need tackling, e.g. planting of trees, farming methods, peat restoration, energy conservation, etc.
One of the weaknesses of many Greens today is to see everything through a lens of Climate Change, and to see fracking as the biggest evil of all. In fact, Green campaigners and architects of the Climate Change Act, the late Stephen Tindale, and Baroness Briony Worthington see shale gas as the way forward, in progressing to a low carbon future. The myopic anti-frack approach has resulted in polarised arguments which help no one.
This fractious polarisation is often fuelled by certain green groups, who cannot, or will not see the big picture. They constantly chant the mantra #keepitintheground. Sadly, a secondary result of my study of fracking is that many Christian Greens make the same mistake.
Over the last five years the clamour against fracking has not been edifying and the church has made no useful contribution. Many commentators have ignored the mass of scientific evidence from so many professional groups, such as the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Royal Society, Public Health England, the HSE, the Environment Agency, the British Geological Survey, CIWEM, the European Union, the US Environmental Protection Agency and dozens more. Much of this is on the internet. A good place to start is http://www.refine.org.uk/
They comment on ‘toxic’ chemicals that are not permitted under UK and EU law. They also ignore the hundreds of research papers that confirm the safety of the process. These commentators prefer health studies that are dismissed by health experts, and histrionic reports of pollution incidents that are nothing to do with fracking.
To me it is a matter of great concern whether for the environment, the well-being of people (and planet), and the credibility of the churches. Thus I am one of the many who support a well-regulated fracking for the sake of the environment.
Not all think I am right!

 

Why no faith in Fracking?

For the last 18 months there have been protests at the fracking site at Preston New Road near Blackpool in Lancashire. There have been over 200 arrests with some convictions. The road is often closed and protestors happily wander across the road and at time surf on lorries. Police have been abused and there has be criminal damage.

At regular intervals there have been faith protests mostly by Quaker, Catholics and wiccans etc.

The week of 23 -28 April has been seen as a “No faith in fracking” Week, with religious activities every day.

So far the general response from activist Christians is that fracking is a very bad thing and most reports from Anglicans, Catholics, Quakers, Methodists etc argue that fracking is both wrong and dangerous.

You can read some of these on the Churches Together in Lancashire website http://www.ctlancashire.org.uk/ See under “Fracking Lancashire” and “engaging issues” and on Catholic “Faith and Justice”. Sadly these are inaccurate  and my response to “The challenge of fracking” is also included, which points out how inaccurately it portrays fracking.  A major problem is that many Christian Greens stay in an echo chamber of anti-fracking greens and don’t take note of experts from statutory bodies like Brit Geolical survey, PHE, Environment Agency and a host of academics working on issues connected with fracking. It is irresponsible and intellectually dishonest to do this.

The blog from “No faith in Fracking” gives their case with quotes from activists.

It is strong in emotion and very weak in fact and makes the usual anti-fracking arguments on climate change and that fracking causes health issues. They give no evidence for their assertions, but then there seems to be none apart form American reports, which though peer-reviewed, have an uncanny knack of being re-tracted for glaring errors.

It is very sad that this represents the public face of churches and faith groups and it seems that anti-fracking, with all its extremism, has high-jacked churches and other faith groups. Sadly Church leaders have not yet seen through them for their dodgy arguments masked by virtue signalling.

None of this does the cause of caring for our planet any good whatsoever. It probably alienates more that it attracts.

What we need is for our faith to inform our concern and protection of the environment and make sure our planet is in better condition when we leave it!!

I ought to add that I am an Anglican priest and before ordination worked as a mining and exploration geologist. I have long considered myself an environmentalist.

I print the blog in full and make my comments where needed.

‘No Faith in Fracking’ Week 23-28 April, Lancashire
Posted on April 18, 2018

https://nofaithinfracking.org/2018/04/18/no-faith-in-fracking-week-23-28-april-lancashire/

The controversial process of fracking* for shale gas could begin in the UK as early as this spring. In response, three months of community and civil society action, under the banner ‘United Resistance’, are being planned from April – June 2018. As part of this, Quakers from the North West are working alongside people of all faiths and spiritualities to co-create a ‘No Faith in Fracking’ week at the Cuadrilla fracking site at Preston New Road (PR4 3PF) near Blackpool from 23-28 April 2018.

The No Faith in Fracking Week will offer a space for people moved by faith and spirit to express in their various and distinctive ways their shared care for the Earth, their resistance to fracking and their concerns about climate change and climate justice.

This is sheer spiritual one-upmanship and assumes anyone of faith will agree with No faith in fracking. It is rather bigoted and ignores all the sincere Christians who disagree and may reckon that fracking is the best (or least bad) for the environment. Here I would include several members of Lancashire for Shale, Prof Younger of Glasgow, Dr Nick Riley – the expert on the Bowland Shales  – to name but a few. WE see that fracking is the best option for mitigating climate change and as it can provide energy throughout the world , then we support climate justice

Wendy Pattinson a Quaker from Lancaster and member of the No Faith in Fracking group said: “Fracking crosses a climate red line and we cannot allow a new source of fossil fuel to take hold in the UK. The oil coal and gas in reserves already in production and development globally is more than we can afford to burn. There is no room for any new coal, oil or gas exploration and production.”[1]

She needs to explain why fracking crosses a climate red line. Without a good argument she has simply resorted to assertion and emotion. She would have done better than to rely on the Friends of the Earth whom were shown to be duplicitous in their activities in Lancashire culminating in their leaflet crossing the requirements of the Advertising Standards Agency which hit the media in Jan 2017  https://michaelroberts4004.wordpress.com/2017/01/04/friends-of-the-earth-fck-it-up/ . Here is the substance of their misinformation as found in their leaflet and spread round Lancashire https://michaelroberts4004.wordpress.com/2015/10/14/dont-let-fracking-destroy-all-of-this/  

She needs a reasoned approach rather than virtue signalling

Dot Kelk, a Catholic from Preston, said: “Pope Francis in his Encyclical Laudato Si puts it very clearly: ‘I urgently appeal..for a new dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet. We need a conversation which includes everyone since the environmental challenge we are undergoing and its human roots concern and affect us all’.

In his Encyclical the Pope said nothing about fracking and spoke in general terms. He cannot be used to support opposition to fracking. What he said and rightly so, is that we MUST care for the environment and also our use of fossil fuels.

Clíodhna Mulhern, a Quaker from Lancaster, said “ Hydraulic fracturing poses significant, proven risk to the health of local people, it undermines local communities, and contaminates air, water and soil – the very building blocks of life. As people of faith and spirit it is our privilege and our duty to protect life on earth and if that means standing at Cuadrilla’s gates then that is where we shall be. “

There are several doubtful statements here. What is the evidence of “proven risk to health”? Medact 1 failed to provide any and Medact2 stated that there was no proof. Yes, local communities have been undermined – by anti-fracking groups and NGOs like Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth. What is the evidence that fracking “contaminates air , water and soil”? Apart from the odd spillage – as happens in any industry including farming – nothing. And the final sentence shows are rather superior attitude, claiming that they , and only they, care for the earth. That is offensive and bigoted.

Chayley Collis, a Quaker from Huddersfield, said: “Fracking is clearly incompatible with the global Paris climate commitment. The UK Government itself has also recently acknowledged that to have a reasonable chance of keeping global temperature rise below 2 degrees we need to leave up to 75% of existing reserves of fossil fuels in the ground” [2]

This was not claimed in the Paris Climate commitment and is ONLY what some environmentalists claim. She needs to read the govt response more precisely. It said “In 2011 the IPCC estimated the amount of carbon within existing proven reserves of coal, oil and gas to be 1,053 billion tonnes. Based on these figures, between 70-75 percent of known fossil fuels would have to be left unused in order to have a 50% chance of limiting global temperature rise to below 2°C.” That answer refers to ALL fossil fuel reserves and not just gas. It does mean it is best to leave the worst fuel  -Coal- in the ground, but it does not say fracking should not occur. This is an emotive, but vacuous, argument

In February 2017 Quakers in Britain issued a statement opposing fracking in the UK Fracking.

This statement https://www.quaker.org.uk/our-work/sustainability/fracking is weak in content but high in activism and gives no fundamental reason to oppose fracking

Hilary Whitehead, a Quaker and one of the organisers of the No Faith in Fracking week, said: “Care for the vulnerable in society, such as those people impacted by climate change, is a theme that unites all faith traditions, as is care for the Earth, our shared home. The No Faith In Fracking Week will bring together a range of faiths and spiritual traditions in upholding the sacredness of Earth. These will include Catholic, Christian, Buddhist, Green Spirit, Wiccan, Quaker and Druid and will involve prayers, rituals, ceremonies, meditations, silent vigils and liturgies at the roadside entrance to Cuadrilla’s fracking site.”

If she really cared for the vulnerable in society she would not put the poor at risk over energy. Again appeals to the sacredness of the earth  means she claims the spiritual high ground and other Christians who dare to disagree are negligent in following their faith teaching

Events planned for the week include:

Tibetan Buddhist chanting and guided meditation,
Christian Celtic Care of Creation
Green Spirit readings from Thomas Berry and Matthew Fox
Earth care rituals
Catholic liturgy
Talks and workshops on the effects of climate change
Walking meditation led by the Community of Interbeing.
Meditations led by Dharma Action Network for Climate Engagement (DANCE)
‘Earth Agape’ Liturgy led by Christian Climate Action and Faith & Resistance Network
Quaker-led silent vigils
Wiccan Wellbeing Celebration Day
Earth and spirit poetry and readings
Songs of Hope
A link to the event diary is here: https://nofaithinfracking.org/events/

The co-ordinators of the week are inviting people of all faiths and spiritualities and none to join the peaceful gatherings at any time during the week. More information:

Notes for the Editor

Press contact: 0798 3355955

A film, with interviews from members and supporters of the No Faith in Fracking group, from a range of faith traditions, is available to view here: https://vimeo.com/255967037

1. ‘The Sky’s Limit’, Oil Change International, 2016 and ‘Tackling climate change: Keeping coal , oil and gas in the ground’ Friends of the Earth briefing, July 2017

2. Fossil Fuels: Written question: https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2016-12-09/56871

3. Faith Against Fracking https://vimeo.com/140180741

Film about US faith groups witness against the fracking industry

* Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a technique designed to recover gas and oil from shale rock.

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